Association of Teachers of Japanese The National East Asian Languages Resource Center Chinese Language Association og Secondary-Elementary Schools Chinese Language Teachers Association American Association of Teachers of Korean

Japanese


Japanese/Korean Linguistics, Volume 6

Image of Japanese/Korean Linguistics, Volume 6
Author:
Publisher: Center for the Study of Language and Inf (1997)
Binding: Paperback, 400 pages
Summary:
Japanese and Korean are typologically quite similar, so a linguistic phenomenon in one language often has a counterpart in the other. The papers in this volume are intended to further compare and/or contrast research in both languages. This selection of papers reflects the Sixth Japanese/Korean Linguistics Conference's division into five subareas: Historical Linguistics, Phonology, Syntax, Semantics, and Discourse. The Sixth Japanese/Korean Linguistics Conference was held at the University of Hawaii at Manoa.
Buy
Publisher

Japanese/Korean Linguistics, Vol. 7

Image of Japanese/Korean Linguistics, Volume 7
Author:
Publisher: Center for the Study of Language and Inf (1998)
Binding: Paperback, 688 pages
Summary:
Japanese and Korean are typologically quite similar, so a linguistic phenomenon in one language often has a counterpart in the other. The papers in this volume are intended to further compare and/or contrast research in both languages. This selection of papers reflects the Seventh Japanese/Korean Linguistics Conference's division into six subareas: Conversation; Language and Culture; Historical Linguistics; Semantics and Pragmatics; Syntax/Semantics; and Phonetics/ Phonology. The Seventh Japanese/Korean Linguistics Conference was held at the University of California, Los Angeles.
Buy
Publisher

Japanese/Korean Linguistics, Vol. 8

Image of Japanese/Korean Linguistics, Volume 8
Author:
Publisher: Center for the Study of Language and Inf (1998)
Binding: Paperback, 560 pages
Summary:
Japanese and Korean are typologically quite similar, so a linguistic phenomenon in one language often has a counterpart in the other. The papers in this volume are intended to further compare and/or contrast research in both languages. This selection of papers reflects the Eighth Japanese/Korean Linguistics Conference's division into five subareas: Conversation and Discourse Analysis; Language Processing; Morphology, Semantics and Grammatical Function; Phonetics, Phonology and Historical Linguistics; and Generative Syntax. The Eighth Japanese/Korean Linguistics Conference was held at Cornell University.
Buy
Publisher

Japanese/Korean Linguistics, Volume 13

Image of Japanese/Korean Linguistics, Volume 13
Author:
Publisher: Center for the Study of Language and Inf (2008)
Binding: Hardcover, 464 pages
Summary:
Japanese and Korean are typologically quite similar languages, and the linguistic phenomena of the former often hve counterparts in the latter. These collections from the annual Japanese/Korean linguistics conference include essays on the phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, historical linguistics, discourse analysis, prosody, and psycholinguistics of both languages. Such comparative studies deepen our understanding of both languages and will be a useful reference to students and scholars in either field.
Buy
Publisher

Japanese/Korean Linguistics, Volume 16

Image of Japanese/Korean Linguistics, Volume 16
Author:
Publisher: Center for the Study of Language and Inf (2009)
Binding: Paperback, 527 pages
Summary:
The annual Japanese/Korean Linguistics Conference provides a forum for presenting research that will broaden the understanding of these two languages, especially through comparative study. The sixteenth Japanese/Korean Linguistics Conference, held in October of 2006 at Kyoto University, was the first in the history of the conference to be held outside of the United States. The thirty-six papers in this volume encompass a variety of areas, such as phonetics; phonology; morphology; syntax; semantics; pragmatics; discourse analysis; and the geographical and historical factors that influence the development of languages, sociolinguistics, and psycholinguistics.
Buy
Publisher

Japanese/Korean Linguistics, Volume 17

Image of Japanese/Korean Linguistics, Volume 17
Author:
Publisher: Center for the Study of Language and Inf (2009)
Binding: Paperback, 510 pages
Summary:
The papers in this volume are from the seventeenth Japanese/Korean Linguistics Conference, which was held at the University of California, Los Angeles in November of 2007. The articles cover a broad range of topics in Japanese and Korean linguistics, including phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, historical linguistics, discourse analysis, prosody, psycholinguistics, sociolinguistics, acquisition, and grammaticalization.
Buy
Publisher

Advances in Japanese Language Pedagogy

Author: Nara, Hiroshi
Publisher: Foreign Language Publications
Binding: paperback, 453pages
Summary:
Essays designed to support informed classroom and curricular decisions. Dispels some of the misunderstandings about Japanese language instruction and introduces the intellectual inquires we are making in the field.
Buy
Publisher

Remembering the Kanji 3: Writing and Reading Japanese Characters for Upper-Level Proficiency (Japanese Edition)

Image of Remembering the Kanji 3: Writing and Reading Japanese Characters for Upper-Level Proficiency (Japanese Edition)
Author: Tanya Sienko, James W. Heisig
Publisher: University of Hawaii Press (2008)
Binding: Paperback, 430 pages
Summary:
Students who have learned to read and write the basic 2,000 characters run into the same difficulty that university students in Japan face: The government-approved list of basic educational kanji is not sufficient for advanced reading and writing. Although each academic specialization requires supplementary kanji of its own, a large number of these kanji overlap. With that in mind, the same methods employed in volumes 1 and 2 of Remembering the Kanji have been applied to 1,000 additional characters determined as useful for upper-level proficiency, and the results published as the third volume in the series. To identify the extra 1,000 characters, frequency lists were researched and crosschecked against a number of standard Japanese kanji dictionaries. Separate parts of the book are devoted to learning the writing and reading of these characters. The writing requires only a handful of new “primitive elements.” A few are introduced as compound primitives (“measure words”) or as alternative forms for standard kanji. The majority of the kanji, 735 in all, are organized according to the elements introduced in Volume 1. For the reading, about twenty-five percent of the new kanji fall into “pure groups” that use a single “signal primitive” to identify the main Chinese reading. Another thirty percent of the new kanji belong to groups with one exception or to mixed groups in which the signal primitives have two readings. The remaining 306 characters are organized first according to readings that can be intuited from the meaning or dominant primitive element, and then according to useful compound terms.
Buy
Publisher

Remembering the Kanji, Vol. 2: A Systematic Guide to Reading Japanese Characters (Japanese Edition)

Image of Remembering the Kanji, Vol. 2: A Systematic Guide to Reading Japanese Characters (Japanese Edition)
Author: James W. Heisig
Publisher: University of Hawaii Press (2008)
Binding: Perfect Paperback, 397 pages
Summary:
Following the first volume of Remembering the Kanji, the present work takes up the pronunciation of characters and provides students with helpful tools for memorizing them. Behind the notorious inconsistencies in the way the Japanese language has come to pronounce the characters it received from China lie several coherent patterns. Identifying these patterns and arranging them in logical order can reduce dramatically the amount of time spent in the brute memorization of sounds unrelated to written forms. Many of the "primitive elements," or building blocks, used in the drawing of the characters also serve to indicate the "Chinese reading" that particular kanji use, chiefly in compound terms. By learning one of the kanji that uses such a "signal primitive," one can learn the entire group at the same time. In this way, Remembering the Kanji 2 lays out the varieties of phonetic patterns and offers helpful hints for learning readings, which might otherwise appear completely random, in an efficient and rational way. A parallel system of pronouncing the kanji, their "Japanese readings," uses native Japanese words assigned to particular Chinese characters. Although these are more easily learned because of the association of the meaning to a single word, Heisig creates a kind of phonetic alphabet of single-syllable words, each connected to a simple Japanese word, and shows how they can be combined to help memorize particularly troublesome vocabulary. Unlike Volume 1, which proceeds step-by-step in a series of lessons, Volume 2 is organized in such as way that one can study individual chapters or use it as a reference for pronunciation problems as they arise. Individual frames cross-reference the kanji to alternate readings and to the frame in Volume 1 in which the meaning and writing of the kanji was first introduced.
Buy
Publisher

Remembering the Kanji, Vol. 1: A Complete Course on How Not to Forget the Meaning and Writing of Japanese Characters

Image of Remembering the Kanji, Vol. 1: A Complete Course on How Not to Forget the Meaning and Writing of Japanese Characters
Author: James W. Heisig
Publisher: University of Hawaii Press (2007)
Binding: Paperback, 460 pages
Summary:
The aim of this book is to provide the student of Japanese with a simple method for correlating the writing and the meaning of Japanese characters in such a way as to make them both easy to remember. It is intended not only for the beginner, but also for the more advanced student looking for some relief from the constant frustration of how to write the kanji and some way to systematize what he or she already knows. The author begins with writing because—contrary to first impressions—it is in fact the simpler of the two. He abandons the traditional method of ordering the kanji according to their frequency of use and organizes them according to their component parts or “primitive elements.” Assigning each of these parts a distinct meaning with its own distinct image, the student is led to harness the powers of “imaginative memory” to learn the various combinations that result. In addition, each kanji is given its own key word to represent the meaning, or one of the principal meanings, of that character. These key words provide the setting for a particular kanji’s “story,” whose protagonists are the primitive elements. In this way, students are able to complete in a few short months a task that would otherwise take years. Armed with the same skills as Chinese or Korean students, who know the meaning and writing of the kanji but not their pronunciation in Japanese, they are now in a much better position to learn to read (which is treated in a separate volume). For further information and a sample of the contents, visit http://nirc.nanzan-u.ac.jp/publications/miscPublications/pdf/RK4/RK%201_sample.pdf.
Buy
Publisher