Association of Teachers of Japanese The National East Asian Languages Resource Center Chinese Language Association og Secondary-Elementary Schools Chinese Language Teachers Association American Association of Teachers of Korean

Grades 9–12




Remembering the Kanji, Vol. 2: A Systematic Guide to Reading Japanese Characters (Japanese Edition)

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Author: James W. Heisig
Publisher: University of Hawaii Press (2008)
Binding: Perfect Paperback, 397 pages
Summary:
Following the first volume of Remembering the Kanji, the present work takes up the pronunciation of characters and provides students with helpful tools for memorizing them. Behind the notorious inconsistencies in the way the Japanese language has come to pronounce the characters it received from China lie several coherent patterns. Identifying these patterns and arranging them in logical order can reduce dramatically the amount of time spent in the brute memorization of sounds unrelated to written forms. Many of the "primitive elements," or building blocks, used in the drawing of the characters also serve to indicate the "Chinese reading" that particular kanji use, chiefly in compound terms. By learning one of the kanji that uses such a "signal primitive," one can learn the entire group at the same time. In this way, Remembering the Kanji 2 lays out the varieties of phonetic patterns and offers helpful hints for learning readings, which might otherwise appear completely random, in an efficient and rational way. A parallel system of pronouncing the kanji, their "Japanese readings," uses native Japanese words assigned to particular Chinese characters. Although these are more easily learned because of the association of the meaning to a single word, Heisig creates a kind of phonetic alphabet of single-syllable words, each connected to a simple Japanese word, and shows how they can be combined to help memorize particularly troublesome vocabulary. Unlike Volume 1, which proceeds step-by-step in a series of lessons, Volume 2 is organized in such as way that one can study individual chapters or use it as a reference for pronunciation problems as they arise. Individual frames cross-reference the kanji to alternate readings and to the frame in Volume 1 in which the meaning and writing of the kanji was first introduced.
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Remembering the Kanji, Vol. 1: A Complete Course on How Not to Forget the Meaning and Writing of Japanese Characters

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Author: James W. Heisig
Publisher: University of Hawaii Press (2007)
Binding: Paperback, 460 pages
Summary:
The aim of this book is to provide the student of Japanese with a simple method for correlating the writing and the meaning of Japanese characters in such a way as to make them both easy to remember. It is intended not only for the beginner, but also for the more advanced student looking for some relief from the constant frustration of how to write the kanji and some way to systematize what he or she already knows. The author begins with writing because—contrary to first impressions—it is in fact the simpler of the two. He abandons the traditional method of ordering the kanji according to their frequency of use and organizes them according to their component parts or “primitive elements.” Assigning each of these parts a distinct meaning with its own distinct image, the student is led to harness the powers of “imaginative memory” to learn the various combinations that result. In addition, each kanji is given its own key word to represent the meaning, or one of the principal meanings, of that character. These key words provide the setting for a particular kanji’s “story,” whose protagonists are the primitive elements. In this way, students are able to complete in a few short months a task that would otherwise take years. Armed with the same skills as Chinese or Korean students, who know the meaning and writing of the kanji but not their pronunciation in Japanese, they are now in a much better position to learn to read (which is treated in a separate volume). For further information and a sample of the contents, visit http://nirc.nanzan-u.ac.jp/publications/miscPublications/pdf/RK4/RK%201_sample.pdf.
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Remembering the Kana: A Guide to Reading and Writing the Japanese Syllabaries in 3 Hours Each (Manoa) (Japanese Edition) (part 1)

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Author: James W. Heisig
Publisher: University of Hawaii Press (2007)
Binding: Paperback, 158 pages
Summary:
Following on the phenomenal success of Remembering the Kanji, the author has prepared a companion volume for learning the Hiragana and Katakana syllabaries of modern Japanese. In six short lessons of about twenty minutes, each of the two systems of “kana” writing are introduced in such a way that the absolute beginner can acquire fluency in writing in a fraction of the time normally devoted to the task. Using the same basic self-taught method devised for learning the kanji, and in collaboration with Helmut Morsbach and Kazue Kurebayashi, the author breaks the shapes of the two syllabaries into their component parts and draws on what he calls “imaginative memory” to aid the student in reassembling them into images that fix the sound of each particular kana to its writing. Now in its third edition, Remembering the Kana has helped tens of thousands of students of Japanese master the Hiragana and Katakana in a short amount of time . . . and have fun in the process.
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Remembering the Hiragana: A Complete Course on How to Teach Yourself the Japanese Syllabary in 3 Hours

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Author: James W. Heisig
Publisher: Japan Pubns (1990)
Binding: Paperback, 80 pages
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Practical Japanese-English Dictionary

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Author: Noah S. Brannen
Publisher: Weatherhill (1998)
Binding: Paperback, 477 pages
Summary:
Perfect for the tourist in Japan or student of Japanese, this handy pocketsize dictionary contains over 8,000 entries, selected and compiled with an emphasis on usefulness and naturalness of expression. For those concerned about their less-than-perfect pronunciation, all entries appear in both Romanized Japanese and Japanese writing—thus the user need only point to be understood.
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Schaums Outline of Japanese Grammar Revised

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Author: Tomiko Kuwahira , Keiko Chevray
Publisher: McGraw-Hill Education (2011)
Binding: Paperback, 264 pages
Summary:
Table of contents 1: Copula. 2: Adjectives. 3: Adverbs. 4: Pronouns. 5: Numbers, Time, Dates, Counters. 6: Particles. 7: Conjunctions. 8: Verbs. 9: Conditional Clauses. 10: Interrogative Words. 11: Modification of a Noun. 12: Nominalization. 13: Modality. 14: Honorific Expressions. 15: Useful Expressions. Answers to Exercises. Index.
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Oxford Take Off in Japanese: A Complete Language Learning Pack Book & 4 Cassettes

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Publisher: Oxford University Press (2000)
Binding: Paperback, 256 pages
Summary:
Take Off In Japanese makes learning or brushing up on the language quick, easy, and fun. Follow an integrated course including activities and dialogues with native speakers so you can feel confident in day-to-day conversation. The course offers expert help when you are travelling with mp3 audio download for practice while on the move. This complete language learning kit contains everything you need to speak, read, and understand Japanese, and gives you flexibility when learning. The pack includes a clear, easy-to-use coursebook, full mp3 audio available to download, and 4 audio CDs to support you as you pick up your new language.
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Oxford Japanese Grammar And Verbs

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Author: Jonathan Bunt
Publisher: Oxford University Press (2002)
Binding: Paperback, 288 pages
Summary:
Oxford Japanese Grammar and Verbs is designed for users at all levels as a learning tool or as a revision aid. It can be used to support any Japanese language course and is ideal for use with Oxford's Take off in Japanese and other audio language learning packs. The guide features: * Brand-new text providing clear and simple explanations * Comprehensive coverage of all the key points of Japanese grammar * Thousands of examples show how the language works * Clear and attractive layout for maximum accessibility * All grammatical terms explained in a glossary * Provides detailed tables of Japanese verbs in an easy-to-use format
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Obentoo Level 2: Teacher Resouce File

Author: Peter Williams, Kyoko Kusumoto, Anne Fisher
Publisher: Cheng & Tsui
Binding: paperback, 300pages
Summary:
Teacher Notes a general introduction to the course and components general suggestions for using the materials general information on assessment of students’ progress a reference list of helpful classroom instructions unit-by-unit notes including unit overviews, teaching suggestions, notes on particular teaching points, suggested structures and vocabulary extension, etc. solutions for tasks in the workbook Blackline masters illustrated vocabulary flashcards supplementary material and solutions extra stroke order practice assessment materials for each unit covering listening, oral interaction, reading and writing skills, and solutions Overhead transparencies Manga-style cartoons for each unit to present in class
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Obentoo Level 2 Student Book

Author: Anne Fisher
Publisher: Cheng & Tsui
Binding: Paperback, pages
Summary:
This obentoo (lunchbox) offers an exciting, culturally based approach to the study of Japanese language. Its clear, colorful, well-structured layout has students discovering the Japanese language and culture through lively and authentic presentation. Obentoo addresses the use of hiragana, katakana, and kanji, is adaptable to a wide variety of course content, and contains a wealth of teacher support material.
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